Global Health Innovation Alliance Accelerator is a 501(c)(3) non-profit recognized by the IRS.

Special thanks to the Duke Law School Community Enterprise Clinic

© 2019 Global Health Innovation Alliance Accelerator. All Rights Reserved. 

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University Tech Transfer Project

This MAP Guide summarizes alternative language for key provisions in model and actual global health alliance agreements. It explores the different approaches on issues including IP ownership, data sharing and safety, liability, and consortium structure and organization.

Link to the sample map guide

GHIAA has developed a survey of university technology transfer experiences with global health technologies. This initiative aims to identify the challenges that universities face when licensing global health products (e.g. vaccines, diagnostics), and collect data on the priorities of and language used by technology transfer offices during negotiations. 

Link to the survey 

The Global Health Alliance Innovation Accelerator’s MAP Guide contains provisions from numerous agreements that address key issues in forming global health alliances.  In order to best expand the guide, We have developed a questionnaire designed to gather additional provisions, agreements and relevant information which are current and relevant.

Link to the questionnaire

November 03, 2019

Zuckerberg on Vaccines, or The Shortcomings of Our Responses to Vaccine Misinformation

By Ana Santos Rutschman

September 22, 2017

Publications by Ana Santos Rutschman (Board member, GHIAA)

Author page for Ana Santos Rutschman, who is a Jaharis Faculty Fellow in Health Law and Intellectual Property and member of the executive board at GHIAA. 

May 22, 2017

Access to Medicines: Policy and Practice Symposium

Hosted by GHIAA and Duke Kenan Center of Ethics

http://kenan.ethics.duke.edu/regulation/2095-2/

April 04, 2017

GHIAA workshop at NC Biotech Center on Apr 4, 2017 ​

March 06, 2017

Comments on Notice of Intent to Grant of an Exclusive License of U.S. Government-Owned Patents on Zika Vaccine to Sanofi Pasteur

Julia Barnes-Weise, founder and Executive Director of Global Healthcare Innovation Alliances (GHIA), and Ana Santos Rutschman, Jaharis Faculty Fellow in health law and intellectual property at DePaul College of Law, commented on the intention of the US Army’s Notice of Intent to Grant of an Exclusive License of U.S. Government-Owned Patents on Zika Vaccine to Sanofi Pasteur. 

February 20, 2017

Alternative Language for Key Provisions In Global Health Alliance Agreements (Summary Chart) by Beibei Sun, Julia Barnes-Weise, Ana Santos Rutschman

MAP Guide Sample Chart by Beibei Sun, Julia Barnes-Weise, Ana Santos Rutschman. The MAP guide addresses critical issues in the formation of global health alliance formation by providing indexed sample of language used in actual and model agreements.  We welcome your language contributions.

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March 06, 2017

University Tech Transfer Project Questionnaire

GHIAA has developed a survey of university technology transfer experiences with global health technologies. This initiative aims to identify the challenges that universities face when licensing global health products (e.g. vaccines, diagnostics), and collect data on the priorities of and language used by technology transfer offices during negotiations. Survey responses will be supplemented with literature reviews and stakeholder interviews to develop an agreement toolkit for global health technology, with resources such as commonly accepted language, redacted provisions from previous agreements, and links to relevant documents.  We will share the results with all interested participants.

 

All responses will be anonymized, and will help fill the evidence gap for licensing in global health.  If you are interested in learning about the project’s findings, please include your contact information.

October 04, 2016

GHIA MAP (Master Alliance Provisions) Guide Project - Chicago Workshop Report

The GHIA team met with a variety of stakeholders and thought leaders in the field of intellectual property and global health to discuss the draft GHIA MAP (Master Alliance Provisions) Guide.  The discussions from this workshop will guide the expansion and contents of the Guide as well as inform the future direction of GHIA’s work.

June 01, 2016

GHIA Symposium Report

This report summarizes the outcomes of the April 1 st Symposium on Alliances and Incentives in

the Era of Outbreaks, hosted by the Global Healthcare Innovation Alliances (GHIA) group at

Duke University. GHIA is an interdisciplinary research team investigating alliances, barriers,

legal structures, and solutions to research and development (R&D) for emerging infectious

diseases (EID) and global medicine challenges, and operates as a part of the Innovation &

Technology Policy (ITP) Lab at the Sanford School of Public Policy.

November 18, 2015

GHIA Workshop Report

This Outcome Report summarizes the discussions that took place during a workshop held in Washington, D.C. on November 18th.  It reflects the views expressed and the discussion that took place, but does not necessarily reflect all opinions or input from attendees (and invitees who participated in the process but were unable to attend.) Names of the participants are listed in annex to this document. In attendance were stakeholders representing government, industry, academia, NGOs, and philanthropic foundations. The workshop was organized by the Global Health Innovation Alliance (GHIA) group, part of the Innovation, Technology, Policy (ITP) Lab of the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University, and took place at the Duke in Washington office.

February 28, 2016

“Incentives, Agreements and Stockpiling to Accelerate the Response to Infectious Disease Outbreaks” – Jeffrey Moe and Julia Barnes Weise

Response to the UN High Commission on Access to Medicines. The critical need for an accelerated global response to existing and future disease outbreaks is widely accepted. A new response will require new structures, processes and policies engaging both the public and private sectors. The new system must be designed to address chronically under-funded diseases (e.g. leishmaniasis, Chagas), high profile current outbreaks (Ebola, Zika virus) and establish a surveillance and response capability for future outbreaks. Moe & BarnesWeise support a “reform from within” approach including the creation of a Center for Health Emergency Preparedness and Response (CHEPR) which includes capabilities for “surveillance for outbreaks and events, risk assessment, planning and execution of response, assessment of IHR functions and compliance, coordination with partners, risk communication, quality assurance, and monitoring”3 as described in “The Neglected Dimension of Global Security: A Framework to Counter Infectious Disease Crises”. 

Access the link to view the letter

June 07, 2015

Ebola and the Accidental Consortia by Julia Barnes-Weise and Ana Santos Rutschman

A year after the 2014 Ebola outbreak, GHIA (Global Healthcare Innovation Alliances) maps the unexpectedly broad alliances formed to combat the disease and considers their implications for future global health crises.

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